SALZBURG — Southern Bank

This is where you will find the old town of Salzburg and most of its attractions.

The sights found here are:
Alter Markt
Getreidegasse
Festung Hohensalzburg
Museum der Moderne
Stift Nonnberg
Dom
Residenz
Franziskanerkirche
Stiftskirche St Peter
Rupertinum
Kollegienkirche
Mozart Geburtshaus
Pferdeschwemme
Haus der Natur
Salzburg Museum

Alter Markt

Alter Markt
Alter Markt is the Old Marketplace in the centre of the old town and it has an impressive row of burghers’ houses. The smallest house in the old town with a width of only 1.42 metres is located next to the famous Tomaselli coffeehouse. This tiny house was built to close a narrow alley between 1830 and 1860. Also here you will find an apothecary that has been here since the end of the 16th century and the traditional coffeehouses — Cafe Tomaselli and Cafe-Konditorei Fürst.

Getreidegasse

Getreidegasse
This is probably Salzburg’s most famous shopping street. Here you will find tall, narrow houses, enticing shops with their wrought iron and gilded signs and narrow but charming passageways and courtyards. Although the houses in the Getreidegasse appear to be very narrow they are not small as they extend far back in depth on both sides of the street. The space behind the row of houses was mainly used as a garden in the past but over time the gardens gave way to workshops, storage buildings, stables and apartments for domestic servants. When the rear buildings were connected to the main buildings they formed the courtyards. During recent years the passageways have became shopping passages. The Schatz Haus passageway leading from Getreidegasse 3 to University Square is probably the most used passageway and well worth a visit. Today most people visit the Getreidegasse for its shops selling jewellery, traditional costumes, the latest fashions, antiques, leather and paper goods, perfumes, delicatessens and just about anything one could want.

Festung Hohensalzburg

Festung Hohensalzburg
This is a sight in Salzburg that you cannot fail to see as it dominates the city skyline and it is one of the largest fortresses in Europe. Prince Archbishop Eberhard built the first castle on the Festungsberg in 1077 but this wasn’t very substantial. The first stone tower was built under the reign of Prince Archbishop Konrad I in the 12th century and the fortress was gradually increased over time by various archbishops. The lavish staterooms are magnificent and there is a lot of armour and weaponry to see inside. There is a museum which has a history of the fortress and a torture chamber. You can reach the fortress by walking up the steep hill or there is a funicular railway — Festungsbahn.
For information about the fortress visit the website at http://www.hohensalzburg.com

Museum der Moderne
The building of this museum has caused a lot of comment with some people describing the outside as looking like a ‘bunker’ but the inside is really well designed and very attractive with its large panoramic windows. There are four levels of halls with an S-shaped floor plan. The collection contains some well known names such as Cezanne and Monet but some of the newer artists are less well-known.
For information about the museum visit the website at http://www.museumdermoderne.at

Traveller's Tip

For a beautiful view take the lift to the terrace where the restaurant is situated.
Stift Nonnberg

Stift Nonnberg
Nonnberg Nunnery was founded between 713 and 715 by St Rupert and is considered to be the oldest nunnery in the World that existed without interruptions. It is found near the foot of the fortress and can be seen from almost every point of the city. The nunnery’s church, Maria Himmelfahrt, is one of Salzburg’s most important churches and is the oldest church dedicated to the Virgin Mary in Salzburg. It was built in late-Gothic style from 1464 to 1506 after a fire had destroyed a good part of the original building in 1423. The Romanesque tower in the West dates back to the early 12th century. The church contains a Romanesque crypt which is worth visiting. The nunnery’s museum is also worth visiting for its Romanesque and Gothic artwork.

Dom

Dom
The Salzburg Cathedral is probably the city’s most important church. The facade is magnificent and the dome inside is stunning. The first cathedral was built on this site by Bishop Virgil in the 8th century but was destroyed by fire and was rebuilt ten years later under the rule of Archbishop Conrad III of Wittelsbach. 400 years later another fire destroyed large sections of the cathedral and it was rebuilt by Archbishop Markus Sittikus to became the first early Baroque church north of the Alps. There are four statues in front of the main facade which is framed by two symmetrical towers. The statues are the apostles Peter and Paul with keys and sword as well as the two patron saints Rupert and Virgil with a salt box and a model of the church. Some of the notable attractions of the church include the baptismal font in which Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was baptised and the main organ surrounded by angels playing instruments. Mozart was the court organist and concert master, and he composed numerous works of sacred music for Salzburg.

Traveller's Tip

If you happen to be in Salzburg during festival time the square where the Cathedral is situated will be home to plays and other performances and if you are there in winter you can visit the Christmas markets that are held here in November/December.
For information about the markets visit the following website: http://www.christmas-markets.org/austria/salzburg/location.php
Residenz

Residenz
This medieval bishops’ residence is a complex of buildings containing around 180 rooms and three spacious courtyards. Here the the prince archbishops of Salzburg held court and entertained important guests up to the 19th century. In recent times it has seen crowned heads, political leaders and prominent figureheads and in 1867 the French Emperor Napoleon III and his wife Eugenie paid an official visit here. Today the Residenz is the venue for official receptions, meetings and international conventions. You can take a self guided audio tour of the building and some of the notable features are the Audience Hall which is probably the most magnificent hall of the Residenz; the Arbeitszimmer (Study), the Schreibzimmer and Schatullenzimmer (Writing Room and Privy Room), the Bedroom, the Gallery, the Throne Room, the White Hall, the Green Room and the Emperor’s Hall with its portraits of the kings and emperors of the Habsburg Dynasty. A corridor directly connects the Emperor's Hall with the choir of the Franciscan Church which was used by Wolf Dietrich to reach the private apartments of the Residenz where his mistress, Salome Alt lived. For information about the Residenz visit the website at:
http://www.residenzgalerie.at/Home.9.0.html?L=1

Franziskanerkirche

Franziskanerkirche
The Franciscan Church is a Gothic church that was built for the middle class. The church’s origins are unclear, but it is thought that it may be older than the Salzburg Cathedral and its construction is attributed to St Virgil. The church is very plain and dark inside except for the magical sunlit hall choir which is well worth a visit. In the tower is one of the oldest preserved bells from 1468.

Stiftskirche St Peter

Stiftskirche St Peter
This church is Romanesque in origin but was renovated in the Baroque style. The interior of the church is richly decorated with lots of gold statues and religious paintings and frescoes. There are several worthy of note including some of the altar paintings by Kremser Schmidt and the Salzburg Maddonna from the early 15th century. One of the chapels in the south aisle contains the memorial for Johann Michael Haydn, a marble plaque for Mozart’s sister, Nannerl, and the tomb of Field Marshal General Hans Werner von Raitenau who was Wolf Dietrich’s father. Mozart conducted his famous Mass in C minor in the church in 1783. At the rear of the church is St Peter’s Cemetery which is one of the oldest and most beautiful cemeteries in the world. Here you will find the graves of many famous personalities, artists, scholars and businessmen. Catacombs are found at the rear of the cemetery and these are of note because they are hewn out of the Mönchsberg rock and are said to be of early Christian origin. There is a small charge to visit these and they are open most days. St Gertrude’s Chapel and the Maximus Chapel are also worth seeing.

Traveller's Tip

The flight scenes from the ‘Sound of Music’ were filmed in the cemetery.

Rupertinum
The Rupertinum originally was used as a school for student priests under Archbishop Paris Lodron. The building was completed in early Baroque style in 1633. Located between the Franciscan and Collegiate Churches, the building served as a seminary for many centuries and as a student dormitory until 1974. In 1983 the Rupertinum was turned over to the public to be used as a museum for modern art and to house a collection of graphic art and photography.
For information about the museum visit the website at http://www.museumdermoderne.at/

Kollegienkirche

Kollegienkirche
This large church was built in the 17th century and was designed by the most prominent Baroque architect of the time, Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach and it was considered to be his most significant accomplishment but unfortunately he was unable to see its completion because he went blind. This church with its grandiose facade is one of the most magnificent Baroque churches in Austria. The chapels inside the church are dedicated to the patron saints of the university’s four faculties — St Thomas Acquinas (Theology), St Ivo (Jurisprudence), St Luke (Medicine) and St Catherine (Philosophy). It is rather bare inside except for the altar with its billowing clouds effect.

Mozart Geburtshaus

Mozart Geburtshaus
The Mozart family lived on the third floor of this house from 1747 to 1773 and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born here on January 27 1756. The International Mozarteum Foundation first installed a museum here on June 15, 1880. It has been enlarged over time to become a cultural venue that draws thousands of visitors from around the world to Salzburg each year. The rooms contain historic instruments, documents, memorabilia and most of the portraits painted during Mozart’s lifetime. Some of the more notable exhibits include Mozart’s child violin, his concert violin, his clavichord, the harpsichord, portraits and letters from the Mozart family.
For information about the museum visit the website at http://www.mozarteum.at/

Pferdeschwemme

Pferdeschwemme
This magnificent Horse Pond was designed and built in 1693 by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach. There is a statue at the front called the ‘Horse Tamer’ and the rear wall is painted with horse frescoes by Josef Ebner. Originally designed as a drinking place for the archbishop’s horses it is now only decorative.

Haus der Natur
The Haus der Natur founded in 1924 is the local natural history museum of Salzburg. Here you will find an aquarium which is considered one of the most beautiful aquariums in Central Europe and is a particularly popular attraction for young and old with its 36 tanks of colorful tropical fish. Living reptiles and amphibians can be found in the Reptile Zoo including domestic snakes, well-known poisonous snakes from all over the world as well as water and land turtles, lizards, frogs and Mississippi alligators all housed in naturally-styled terrariums. The Space Research Hall features an original-size diorama of the moon landing, a space station of the future, a mercury spacecraft in original size as well as a number of rocket models. The new Science Centre lets visitors operate turbines or hear and feel the music in a walk-in violin. If you are travelling with children they will love this museum.
For information about the museum visit the website at http://www.hausdernatur.at/en_home.html

Salzburg Museum
This relatively new museum is found in the magnificent New Residence on Mozart Square. The museum consists of objects of art, presentations, interesting facts and multimedia installations and it was the winner of the Austrian Museum Award in 2009. The exhibitions on the first floor present the life of interesting men and women from Salzburg working in the fields of art, architecture, science, literature, music, photography and handicrafts. The permanent exhibition on the second floor of the New Residence including the state rooms concentrates on Salzburg’s development in history, art and culture since the beginning of modern times. Also here in the Mirror Hall is the Archeology and Medieval Collection. Archeological finds from the excavations in the New Residence, including a painted Roman wall can be found in the Panorama Passage, an underground passage between the Salzburg Museum and the Panorama Museum. The Art Hall under the inner courtyard of the New Residence is a huge multipurpose hall equipped with a full-length illuminated ceiling and is used as a venue for three special exhibitions each year.
For information about the museum visit the website at http://smca.at/163.html