VIENNA — Stephansplatz

This is the centre of the Innere Stadt and is a good place to start exploring the city from. It contains the main thoroughfares of Kärntner Strasse, Graben and Rotenturmstrasse which in turn connect to some of the other sights to be found in Vienna.

The sights found here are:
Stephansdom
Erzbischöfilches Palais

Stephansdom

Stephansdom
The Gothic Cathedral of St Stephen has survived through many wars and has become a symbol of Vienna’s freedom. It was first built in 1147 AD and the diamond-patterned tile roof was added in 1952. It is an impressive building and its two best features are the huge roof and the tall northern tower which is 136.7 metres high and is called Alter Steffl or ‘Old Steve’. Inside the cathedral you will find some art treasures such as the 15th century altarpiece of Wiener Neustadt found in the left chapel of the choir. Other pieces include the pulpit by Anton Pilgrim with its interesting symbols on the railings. Look out for the 17th century tomb of Emperor Frederick 111 in the Apostle’s choir with its unusual decorations. Among the important events that have occurred at St Stephen’s are Mozart’s wedding in 1782 and his funeral in December 1791.

Traveller's Tip

You can take an elevator ride to the top of the tower for a great view and to take a look at the Pummerin bell which is one of the largest bells in the world and it rings out over the city on New Year’s Eve.

Erzbischöfilches Palais
To the north of the cathedral is the Erzbischöfilches Palais or Archbishop’s Palace which was built in 1640 and now houses the Dom & Diözesanmuseum. In this museum you will find some magnificent religious art spanning over 1000 years. There are also two Syrian glass vessels thought to be among the oldest in the world.