VIENNA — Alsergrund

Alsergrund is the northern border of the districts inside the Gürtel. There are many grand buildings found in this area including the lovely Palais Liechtenstein housing the Liechenstein Museum and the Serviten Kirche with its Baroque interior and oval nave inspired by the Karlskirche. Another building of interest here because of its eccentricity is the Fernwärme found in Spittelauer Lände which was once an incinerator but has been turned into a building that has a wonderful chimney stack crowned with a huge golden bulb.

The sights found here are:
Liechtenstein Museum
Sigmund Freud Museum
Josephinum
Pathologisch-Anatomische Bundesmuseum
Schubert Geburtshaus

Liechtenstein Museum

Liechtenstein Museum
The Palais Liechtenstein was the home of the Royal family of Liechtenstein until 1938 when they returned to their homeland. The building is simply magnificent with its frescoes and painted ceilings and some of the highlights not to be missed are the Gentleman’s Apartment Library with its 100,000 books and the Hercules Hall with its two-storey ceiling frescoes of Hercules motifs. The manicured gardens are also magnificent. The museum holds the private collection of Prince Hans-Adam 11 of Liechtestein which is one of the largest private collections in the world with over 200 paintings by the masters and 50 sculptures dating from 1500 to 1700. You will find some of the highlights of the art collection on the seventh floor. These include Raphael’s Portrait of a Man and Rubens’ Decius Mus cycle and his Portrit of Clara Serena Rubens. There are other works by van Dyck and Rembrandt. Audio guides are available for a small charge.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.liechtensteinmuseum.at/en/pages/home.asp

Traveller's Tip

There is a concert in the Hercules Hall every Sunday at 11am and 3 pm in the Hercules Hall and information about this can be found on the website.

Sigmund Freud Museum
This is the house where Dr Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis lived and worked from 1891 to 1938. After this he was forced to emigrate. His office and private apartment are now a museum and included in the museums’s collection is the original furniture from his waiting room, some of the pieces from his antique collection and some of his personal belongings. There is a media room with some original film and sound recordings of Freud and his family.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.freud-museum.at/cms/index.php/en_home.html

Josephinum
The Josephinum is home to the Institute for the History of Medicine of the Medical University of Vienna and it houses a museum that exhibits the anatomical specimens of the Josephinum collection. The Josephinum was named after and founded by Emperor Joseph II and the building in the neo-Classicist style is the most important piece of work by Isidor Marcellus Amandus Canevale, an important architect of this period. The exhibits found in the museum include models made of the human frame over 200 years ago by Felice Fontana and Paolo Mascagni to be used by army surgeons to improve their skills. The models which were meant to give students a 3-D understanding of the organs, bones, veins and muscles are superb and very realistic. Other exhibits in the museum are medical instruments, photos of operations and illnesses and medical textbooks.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.meduniwien.ac.at/josephinum/?id=507&L=1

Pathologisch-Anatomische Bundesmuseum
The Pathological Anatomy Museum is another of Vienna’s unusual museums. It is the former insane asylum from 1784 to 1866 housed in the Narrenturm. The exhibits consist of medical abnormalities preserved in jars of formaldehyde,wax models of horrid diseases and deformed skeletons. This museum is for those who enjoy something out of the ordinary.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.narrenturm.at/

Schubert Geburtshaus
This is the house where the composer Franz Schubert was born on 31 January 1797 and where he spent the first four and a half years of his childhood. The apartment consisted of one room and a kitchen with an open fire. There isn’t much to see here except for some of his personal belongings including a pair of his glasses and documentation of his life and works. The house also includes the Stifter memorial rooms with fifty of his paintings.
For information about the museum visit the website at:
http://www.wienmuseum.at/de/standorte/ansicht.html?tx_wxlocation_pi2[showUid]=25&cHash=2169a560bd