VIENNA — Western Vienna

Western Vienna includes the districts of Liesing, Hietzing, Penzing, Rudolfsheim-Fünfhaus, Ottakring, and Hernals covering the area from the Wienerwald to the Gürtel.

The sights found here are:
Jubiläumswarte
Hofpavillon Hietzing
Hietzinger Friedhof
Technisches Museum
Kirche am Steinhof
Ernst Fuchs Privat Museum
Lainzer Tiergarten
Hermesvilla
Kirche zur Heiligsten Dreifaltigkeit

Jubiläumswarte
The Jubilee observation point found in the district of Ottakring in the Wiennerwald or the woods of Vienna was erected in 1899 from designs by architect Karl Hoegler. This observation platform is quite difficult to find but the fantastic view you get of the city after climbing the 183 spiralling steps is definitely worth the effort.There are signs to let you know what you are seeing and on a clear day you can see the mountains which are well over a hundred kilometres away. To get here from the city you will need to catch the U4 to Hütteldorf and take bus no 148 to the final stop and you should see the tower from here.
For information about the timetable for the bus route no 148 visit the website at: http://efa.vor.at/vor/XSLT_TTB_REQUEST?language=en

Hofpavillon Hietzing

Hofpavillon Hietzing
Otto Wagner originally built this pavilion as a private station for the emperor and his court between 1898 and 1899. The highlight of the pavilion is the domed room which was the emperor’s waiting room. It is furnished in mahogany with gold fittings and magnificent decorations. The interior was designed by Wagner and Olbrich.
For information about Hofpavillon Hietzing visit the website at: http://www.wienmuseum.at/de/standorte/ansicht/otto-wagner-hofpavillon-hietzing-1.html

Hietzinger Friedhof
This cemetery is famous for the fact that it contains the graves of some of Vienna’s most famous people such as Otto Wagner, Klimt and Mosser. It has been enlarged several times and is currently 42,100 square metres. There are two parts to the cemetery — the older part consists of burial sites of the Biedermeier period and these are rather modest but the newer part is more elaborate, depending on the wealth of the families buried there.

Technisches Museum
This museum opened in 1918 and displays exhibits of modern technology. The museum is spread over four levels and there are lots of hands-on experiences of the latest technologies. The ground floor exhibits are associated with Nature and Knowledge and there are lots of interactive scientific experiments. The next floor is for Heavy Industry and Energy and there are lots of engines to look at. One of the best displays is the giant mouse wheel in the Energy section. The top two floors contain temporary exhibitions and also permanent Transport and Musical Instrument exhibitions including restored trams and planes. If you are travelling with children there are some special programmes available especially on the third floor where you will find Das Mini with its toys and activities aimed at 2 to 6 year old children.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.tmw.at/default.asp?id=1&cid=0&al=Englisch&am=

Kirche am Steinhof

Kirche am Steinhof
This unusual church was built by Otto Wagner between 1905 and 1907. It was built in the grounds of what was then the largest and most modern psychiatric hospital in Europe. It is a wonderful example of Jugendstil which is the Art Nouveau style, and the only one of its style in Vienna. Probably its most striking feature is its copper-covered dome roof which is only seen from outside the church but inside there are some striking mosaics and stained glass windows. The church has been recently renovated but it is only open to the public on Saturday at 3 pm via a tour which costs around 4 euros because the church still serves Vienna’s psychiatric hospital. It is located in Penzing on the Baumgartnerhöhe below the Galitzinberg and can be reached by bus no 48A from Burgring.

Ernst Fuchs Privat Museum
Ernst Fuchs was an artist of the Phantastical Realism style. In the early 1970’s Fuchs bought the Villa Wagner which he converted into his living and working space for many years but in 1988 the villa was converted into a private museum. Today Fuchs lives and works in Monte Carlo. The villa was built in 1888 by Otto Wagner first as a summer residence for him and his family but later, he lived there all year round. The villa deteriorated over the years and was saved from demolition by Ernst Fuchs. Many parts of it were restored as it was in Otto Wagner’s time there but other parts were designed by Fuchs such as some of the large paintings and furniture.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.ernstfuchs-zentrum.com/html/starteng6.html

Lainzer Tiergarten
The Lainzer Tiergarten is named after the deer enclosure that was once found in this area. The forest in this part of the Vienna Woods served as hunting grounds for the Habsburg Emperors for centuries. The Lainzer Tiergarten is the largest of Vienna’s parks. It is not really a zoo in the true sense of the word but rather a place where wild boar, deer, squirrels and so on roam freely as well as the Lipizzaner horses that spend the summer here. The animals are fed every day by the park staff at 2pm. You can find out where this will be by checking on the notice board at the park entrance. There are lots of walking tracks in the park as well as the Hermesvilla and a viewing platform. The park is open all year and entrance is free. To get there you will need to take bus line 60B to Lainzer Gate. There is a visitor centre as you enter the park from Gate Lainzer.

Hermesvilla

Hermesvilla
In the 19th century Emperor Franz Joseph I built a magnificent villa in the Lainzer Tiergarten called Hermesvilla for his wife Empress Elisabeth, better known as Sisi. He wanted to give her a place where she could do her horseback riding away from the strictures of the court and as an attempt to keep her in Vienna so she wouldn’t travel as much but it really didn’t have the desired effect as she spent little time here. It was designed by the architect Karl Von Hasenauer, who had also designed the Burgtheater and was built between 1882 and 1886. The road leading to Hermesvilla was the first one in Vienna to be illuminated with electric street lights and in 1896, the villa was equipped with a telephone connection. After WW2 Soviet troops occupied the building until 1955 and when they left they took doors, windows and even wallpapers as well as furniture and artwork. It was restored in 1962 and it is now a popular destination for day trips from the city. Today it is part of the Vienna Museum and it houses temporary art exhibitions and some of the rooms are laid out like they were when Franz Joseph I and Sisi lived there. There is a lot of dark wood and highly ornate furniture as well as brass, gold, marble and silk. One of the highlights is the original bedroom of the Empress with its opulent Baroque bed and the walls and ceilings covered in scenes from Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream which are very over-the-top even though they were painted by such famous artists as Hans Makart and Gustav Klimt. The gardens are a really pleasant place to walk.
For information about Hermesvilla visit the website at:
http://www.wienmuseum.at/en/locations/location-detail/hermesvilla-1.html

Kirche zur Heiligsten Dreifaltigkeit

Kirche zur Heiligsten Dreifaltigkeit
The Church of the Holy Trinity is a Roman Catholic church. It is a very unusual relatively modern church made of concrete blocks and was built between 1974 and 1976. It is considered ugly by some but it does make a powerful statement whichever way you view it. It is commonly known as Wotrubakirche after its designer, Fritz Wotruba.