COPENHAGEN — Christianshavn

This is the area is found to the east of the inner city of Copenhagen. It was once a working class area but today it is a trendy part of the city and a desirable place to live full of cafes, bars, restaurants, lovely canal side houses as well as ultra modern buildings. Christianshavn is an artificial island that was created from swampy land by King Christian 1V in the early 17th century as part of the southern fortification of the city. It was designed along the lines of Amsterdam with a canal cutting straight through the middle of the area and from here Danish merchants sailed to other places to trade. This is still evident today with the many boats seen around here as well as the bars along the waterfront.

The sights found here are:
Copenhagen Opera House
North Atlantic House
Danish Architecture Centre
The Royal Danish Naval Museum
Church of Our Saviour
Christiania
Lille Mølle
Christianshavns Vold
Christian’s Church

Copenhagen Opera House
This state-of-the-art opera house is among one of the world’s most modern opera houses. The opera house is worth visiting for the building itself which is clad in limestone with a beautful marble foyer but one of its most extravagnt features would have to be the ceiling of the main auditorium which is covered in sheets of 24-carat gold leaf. The opera house features two stages and there are fourteen storeys, five of them underground. You can hear anything from classic to contemporary opera, or a performance from a rock star or other musical genres. Tickets for concerts here are very popular but if there are unsold tickets you can get them for half-price at the Opera House box office from 6pm on the night of the performance. There is a good restaurant and a cafe here as well. You can take a guided tour of the building on Saturdays and Sundays at 9.30am and 4.30pm at a cost of 100kr.
For information about the opera house visit the website at: http://kglteater.dk

North Atlantic House

North Atlantic House
This art centre is found on the waterfront and features culture and art from the North Atlantic area. It has three galleries and conference facilities as well as the Icelandic embassy and representatives of Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Here you can find at various times of the year a mixture of exhibitions, concerts, dance and musical performances, film and lectures. The building itself is interesting as it was an old maritime warehouse dating from the mid 18th century.
For information about the North Atlantic House visit the website at: http://www.bryggen.dk

Danish Architecture Centre
This centre is found in the Gammel Dok warehouse in Christianshavn. It contains exhibitions on Danish and International architecture with models, sketches and photographs. The centre aims to be a source of inspiration for new and innovative building projects and to promote architecture to everyone. If you are interested in Danish architecture then this centre is worth visiting. There is also a really good bookshop with books on architecture in both Danish and English. Tours of historical and new architecture in Copenhagen can be taken from here and information about these tours can be found on the website.
For information about the Centre visit the website at: http://www.dac.dk/en/front-page/

The Royal Danish Naval Museum
This museum is housed in what was once a naval hospital. The museum contains displays relating to the maritime history of Denmark and includes more than 300 model ships. Some of these model ships were designed by naval engineers and served as prototypes for actual naval ships.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.orlogsmuseet.dk

Traveller's Tip

If you are travelling with children make sure that you take them to see the children’s ship which they can board. It is found in the Children’s Museum and is a reconstruction of a Danish warship with huge cannons ready to fire.
Church of Our Saviour

Church of Our Saviour
This large Baroque church is one of Demark’s most famous churches due in no small part to its extraordinary green and gold spire. You can climb to the top of the spire but be aware that there are 400 steps and the last 150 of these are found on the outside and they get narrower as you go along. The spire is modelled after Bormini’s tower on the church of St Ivo in Rome. Inside the church you will find a splendid altar with its decoration of cherubs and other figures.
For information about the church visit the website at: http://www.vorfrelserskirke.dk/english

Traveller's Tip

Be aware that the spire is only open to climb at certain times of the year so visit the website to find out when it is open.
Christiania

Christiania
Christiania is a self-governing ‘free town’ that was established in 1971 after a group of hippies stormed a disused military barracks and set up home there. The area is car free but you can reach it by bike or by public transport either taking the metro to Christianshavn station and walking for 500 metres or take bus number 66 from Vesterport and the Central station which leaves every 10 minutes and drops you right at the entrance. There are lots of interesting buildings to see here and it is a popular tourist destination. You should be aware that this area is like no other in Copenhagen and it can be quite dangerous at times in some parts of it. The area around Pusher Street is somewhere in particular where you should take precautions and it is advisable not to take photgraphs here. At the main entrance to Chrisitiania there is a sign listing the rules applied to the area and you should take note of these for your own safety. A good way to see the area is to take a guided tour which are available everyday at 3pm throughout the summer months and on weekends at other times. The tours are in English and Danish and cost around 40DKK which is paid to the tour guide. You take the tour from the entrance.
For information about Christiania visit the website at: http://www.christiania.org

Lille Mølle

Lille Mølle
Lille Mølle is a windmill that was built in 1783 and is the only surviving example of the many windmills that formerly stood around Christianshavn. The windmill was originally used for grinding wheat but at the beginning of the 20th century it was converted into a private home. In 1973 it was given to the National Museum and it is still furnished in the style of its former owners who were quite flamboyant. The windmill is found on the ramparts southwest of Christiania. Next door is the former home of the miller who worked in the windmill but it is now a very good restaurant with outdoor seating on the edge of the ramparts.
For information about Lille Mølle visit the following website at: http://natmus.dk/en/besoeg-museerne/tre-historiske-hjem/lille-moelle/

Traveller's Tip

You can take a guided tour of the windmill and information about the tour can be found on the website.
Christianshavns Vold

Christianshavns Vold
This is the only part that is left of the old fortification that used to surround Copenhagen. It dates from the 1600s and was used as a military facility until 1916.This is a popular place for people to walk around with its charming early 19th century houses along the canals. It is now part of Christiania. You get here by taking bus 2A from City Hall or Central Station and get off at Market Street.

Christian’s Church

Christian’s Church
This church which is named after King Christian 1V was built between 1754 and 1759 but the steeple wasn’t finished until 1769. It served as a church for the German congregation at Christianshavn until 1886 and it was reconsecrated as a normal Danish parish church in 1901. The interior is quite magnificent with its Rococo decoration and three-storied galleries. There is a crypt you can visit which contains 48 burial chapels. The church is often used for concerts and public speeches including the Dalai Lama who spoke here in 2000.