ASWAN — Lower Nubia

There are several places to visit that are close to Aswan that you can get to either on a tour that you can arrange through your hotel or the various tour agencies around town or you can make your own way by taxi or by hiring a felucca or motor boat.

The sights found around Lower Nubia are:
Wadi as-Subua
Amada
Qasr Ibrim

Wadi as-Subua

Wadi as-Subua
The temples of Wadi as-Subua are found 140kms south of Aswan on the western shore. They were moved to this site like others in the region because of the building of the High Dam between 1961 and 1965. Wadi as-Subua means Valley of Lions and refers to the avenue of ten sphinxes that stood in front of the Temple of Ramses 11. The exterior of the temple is sandstone but the vestibule, antechamber and sanctuary was carved from rock. At the entrance to the temple are the remains of huge statues of Ramses and in the courtyard behind there are more statues of him. The middle sanctuary was converted into a church and the reliefs were then plastered over and painted with saints.
About a kilometre to the north is the Temple of Dakka which was begun by Arkamani in the 3rd century BC and building continued under the Ptolemy rule and the Roman Emperors, Augustus and Tiberius but it was never finished. It was dedicated to the god of wisdom, Throth.
The Temple of Maharraqa is the smallest of the temples found here. The walls of this temple are rather bare as the decorations were never finished. It was built in Roman times and was dedicated to Isis and Serapis (an Alexandrian god).

Traveller's Tip

Climb the 12m high pylon at the Temple of Dakka for wonderful views of Lake Nasser and the other temples.
Amada

Amada
The Amada Temple is located about 180 kilometres south of the High Dam. It is a small temple and the oldest of the Lake Nasser temples. The temple was built at the time of the new kingdom by Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II and was later added to by Tuthmosis IV and Seti I and was dedicated to the important New Kingdom gods, Amun-Ra and Ra-Harakhty. The painted reliefs within the temple are interesting, particularly one section where Tuthmosis III is worshiping Amun-Ra and where Amenhotep II is worshiping Ra-Harakhty. Unfortunately when Tuthmosis IV added to the temple he chipped away representations of Amun. When the early Christians took over the temple they also made the structure a church capped by a cupola and in the process did some damage to the original temple but when they plastered over some of the reliefs they preserved them making these reliefs some of the finest remaining in any Nubian temple.
Nearby is the Temple of Derr which was also dedicated to Amun-Ra and Ra-Harakhty. The front of this temple was damaged but some of the reliefs are well-preserved and worth seeing with their bright colours. A few minutes walk from here you will find the Tomb of Pennut who was the local governor during the reign of Ramses V1. There is still a little colour on some of the reliefs found here.

Qasr Ibrim
This is the only Nubian monument that you can still see in its original position and it is found 15 kilometres north of Abu Simbel. It was originally built as a fortification because of its strategic point overlooking the Nile. Originally it probably would have been a large complex but the only visible remains today is the quasr or castle. Extensive work has been carried out here by archeologists and at present this site is closed to the public.