PARIS — Enclos-St-Laurent

The 10th arrondissement is found on the Right Bank and is little known to tourists being far from the major sights. It is a working class area not far from the city centre that is beginning to attract young professionals and artists. There are some interesting areas such as the Canal St Martin neighbourhood.

The sights found here are:
Church of Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Gare du Nord
Gare de l’Est
Canal Saint-Martin
Passage Brady
Passage du Prado
Porte Saint-Denis
Musée de l’Eventail
Porte Saint-Martin

Church of Saint-Vincent-de-Paul

Church of Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
This church was built from 1824 to 1844 on the site of the ancient Saint-Lazare prison enclosure. On this enclosure was the Maison Saint-Lazare which was the home and workplace of Saint Vincent de Paul. Inside there is a sculpture of him being glorified and surrounded by figures symbolising his saintly actions such as a missionary, a galley slave and Daughters of Charity healing the sick. This church is twinned with St Pancras Old Church in London. The organ in the church was once played by Louis Braille (who made the Braille alphabet for the blind).

Gare du Nord

Gare du Nord
This is possibly the most important train station in Paris because the Eurostar arrives and departs from here and it is an interchange point between the Paris Métro and the main line RER serving the Charles de Gaulle Airport. It also is the main line station connecting other trains from all over Europe. It is one of the five busiest train stations in the world. This train station was first built in 1846 but it was too small so it was pulled down and rebuilt between 1861 and 1865 but since then it has been rebuilt and extended several times. The façade was designed around a triumphal arch and has a lot of stonework. At the top of the building are statues representing the cities that the station serves.

Traveller's Tip

The Gare du Nord has been used as the backdrop for several films such as The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Ultimatum, Ocean’s Twelve and Mr Bean’s Holiday.

Gare de l’Est
The square in front of the Gare de l’Est was where the Saint-Laurent Fair was held between the 13th and 18th centuries. The original building which is now the western wing was built between 1847-1850 and served the Paris-Strasbourg line. Its name was changed from Gare de Strasbourg to Gare de l’Est in 1854. Today, trains leave from here for eastern France, Germany, Switzerland and Austria.

Canal Saint-Martin

Canal Saint-Martin
The Canal Saint-Martin was built in 1802 to link to the Canal de l’Ourq and supply fresh water to the city. The neighbourhood of the Canal Saint-Martin is found between the Gare du Nord and République in the northeast of Paris. The canal runs into the Seine River in the south and the Bassin de Villete and the Canal de l’Ourq in the north. The banks of the Canal Saint-Martin are very popular in the summer when lots of locals come here to picnic and play music. Along these banks you will find cafes and boutiques.

Traveller's Tip

A different way to tour Paris is to take a boat to explore the canals and underground waterways that run from the Île Saint Louis near the Notre Dame to the Canal de l’Ourq to the north of the city. There are two companies that offer canal tours and theses are Canauxrama which has two and a half hour cruises and Paris Canal that has half day cruises.
For more information about these canal trips visit the following websites at: http://www.canauxrama.com or http://www.pariscanal.com/#
Passage Brady

Passage Brady
This is known as ‘Little India’ of Paris with its shops selling Indian saris, Indian restaurants and Indian spice shops. The Passage Brady is a great place to visit to look at the exotic fruits and vegetables, the fragrant bags of rice, oriental oils, teas, costumes, jewellery and original DVDs straight from Bollywood. It is best to visit during the week when it is at its most lively.

Passage du Prado

Passage du Prado
This covered passage is L-shaped and not as exotic as the Passage Brady but it is a good place to visit for cheap clothes, food, haircuts and Bollywood DVDs. Make sure you take a look at the ceiling as the roof style here is different to Passage Brady.

Porte Saint-Denis

Porte Saint-Denis
This arch was built between 1671 and 1674 for Louis X1V to replace a medieval gate in the city walls and to commemorate his military victories. The kings of France rode throught this gate when they returned from the Basilica of Saint-Denis. Napoléon’s troops also passed through the arch to enter the city in 1816 after a victorious campaign. Queen Victoria was the last monarch to pass through this gate when she visited the Universal Exposition in 1855. It was also the place of the June Revolution in 1848 where over 30 people were killed or wounded. The arch was the inspiration for the Arc de Triomphe and the Manhatten Bridge in New York. The bas-relief on the southern façade represents the victories of Louis X1V on the Rhine and on the northern façade it shows the capture of the town of Maastricht.

Musée de l’Eventail
This museum is a private museum of fans located at 2 Boulevard de Strasbourg. It is open from 2.30pm until 6pm from Monday to Wednesday and is closed during August. It costs €6. The museum is found in a workshop for fan-making and restoration called the Atelier Anne Hoguet. The museum was established in 1993 and displays fans from the 18th century to today. There are also exhibits of tools, workbenches and materials used in making fans, including pearl, ivory, shell, bone, and wood.

Porte Saint-Martin

Porte Saint-Martin
This is another triumphal arch built for Louis X1V to commemorate his military victories. Both this gate and Porte Saint-Denis symbolised the entrance into Paris and their only use was ornamental. The building of this arch immediately followed the building of Porte Saint-Denis. The bas-relief on the southern façade of this arch shows the taking of the town of Besançon and the northern façade shows the taking of the town of Limbourg and the defeat of the Germans.