PARIS — Passy

The 16th arrondissement of Paris is a wealthy, conservative, residential neighbourhood with many impressive homes and has a village-like atmosphere. There are quite a few museums between the Place du Trocadero and the Place d’Iena.

The sights found here are:
Jardin d’Acclimatation
Avenue Foch
Musée d’Ennery
Musée d’Art Dentaire Pierre Fauchard
Musée Baccarat
Musée Galliera
Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
Guimet Museum
Palais de Chaillot
Musée Clemenceau
Passy Cemetery
Maison de Balzac
Château de la Muette
Musée Marmottan Monet
Jardin des Serres d’Auteuil
Bois de Boulogne

Jardin d’Acclimatation

Jardin d’Acclimatation
This 49 acre children’s park is found in the northern section of the Bois de Boulogne. The visit starts with a ride on a narrow-gauge train from Porte Maillot to the garden entrance, through a wooded park. The train operates at 10-minute intervals daily from 10.30am until the park closes. In the park there are plenty of amusements for adults and children including a house of mirrors, an archery range, a miniature-golf course, zoo animals, a puppet theatre, a playground, pony rides and boat rides and a whole host of others you can find on the website. Inside the gate you will find an easy to follow map and there is also a map on the website.
For information about the park visit the website at:http://www.jardindacclimatation.fr

Avenue Foch
This is one of the most prestigious streets in Paris and is home to some of Paris’ grand mansions, including ones belonging to the Onassis and the Rothschild families. It runs from the Arc de Triomphe southwest to the Porte Dauphine at the edge of the Bois de Boulogne. It is the widest avenue in Paris and is lined with chestnut trees. It was named after Marshal Foch who was the Allied Supreme Commander of WW1 in 1929 having several names prior to this.

Musée d’Ennery
The collections in this museum started out as the private collection of Clémence d’Ennery in the 19th century which was then turned into a public museum towards the beginning of the 20th century. There are around 7,000 objects illustrating the daily life of those living in China and Japan from the 12th to the 19th centuries. Included in this collection are ceramics, porcelain, dolls, figurines, furniture, carvings of precious stones, ivories, bronzes and lacquerwork. The museum is presently closed for renovation.
For information about the museum visit the following website at:http://www.guimet.fr/-About-the-museum-

Musée d’Art Dentaire Pierre Fauchard
This is a museum of dental history which is found at the Ordre National des Chirurgiens-Dentistes and is open Wednesday afternoons by appointment. The museum was established in 1879 to display display old techniques and tools associated with dentistry. It was named after Pierre Fauchard who was sometimes called the father of modern dentistry. It now has over 1,000 dental items including instruments and dental chairs from the 17th to the 19th century, items for the cleaning and extraction of teeth and dental prosthetics. There are also etchings and paintings and an original version of Fauchard’s Le Chirurgien Dentiste which was published in 1728.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.fauchard.org/history/museums/paris_museum_of_dentistry.html

Musée Baccarat
If you like crystal then this is the museum for you. It is housed in a beautiful mansion that was once the home of the Viscountess de Noailles who held fabulous parties there attended by artists like Man Ray, Cocteau and Dali. The decor is magnificent with highlights being a crystal chandelier sunk in an aquarium of water, a two metre high glass chair, ‘talking’ Baccarat vases that make use of holography and a non-stop soundtrack, as well as glassware once used by the American President Roosevelt and Pope John Paul II, and Tsar Nicholas II’s candelabra. At least try and have a look at the restaurant found here called the Baccarat Crystal Room with its amazing decor.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.baccarat.fr/fr/univers-baccarat/musees/museum-opening-hours.htm

Musée Galliera
This museum is also known as the City of Paris Museum of Fashion. It opened in 1977 and is housed in a Renaissance-style palace built at the end of the 19th century for the Duchesse de Galliera. The museum has both temporary and permanent exhibitions of French fashion and costumes from the 18th century to the present day. Included in this collection are clothes owned by Marie-Antoinette, Louis XVII, Empress Josephine, the dress worn by Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's. It also has displays of fashions by the leading 19th and 20th century designers including Balenciaga, Pierre Balmain, Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Givenchy, Paco Rabanne, Yves Saint Laurent and Elsa Schiaparelli amongst others. Each year it presents two or three exhibitions, on a specific theme or a single couturier, where they show part of the huge collection of clothing and accessories and the museum is open only during this time so if you wish to visit it is best to check if it will be open.
For information about the museum visit the following website at:http://www.paris.fr/portail/loisirs/portal.lut?page_id=5854

Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
This museum opened in 1961 and is dedicated to the art of the 20th century and in the near future 21st century. It is found in the eastern wing of the Palais de Tokyo which is an Art Deco building that was built for the International Exhibition of Arts and Technology in 1937. There are both permanent which are free and temporary which you pay for exhibitions. The permanent exhibitions found on the lower floors include Fauvist paintings by Maurice Vlaminck and André Derain, and there are also early works by Pablo Picasso as well as those by Robert and Sonia Delaunay, Chagall, Matisse, Rothko, and Modigliani. The temporary exhibits are about individual artists from all over the world or trends in international art.
For information about the museum visit the website at:http://mam.paris.fr/en/node/155

Guimet Museum
This museum holds the largest collection of Asian art outside of Asia. It was started by Emile Guimet who was an industrialist who was interested in other cultures and beliefs. He was commissioned by the government to travel to and study the cultures of Japan, China and India. Whilst doing this he acquired a wonderful collection of 300 paintings and 600 sculptures which was the basis of the Guimet Museum. It was taken over by the state in 1927 and more artefacts from others were acquired and the collection grew. In the 1990s the museum underwent a complete renovation and in 2000 it reopened its doors as a light and airy modern building with an amazing array of Asian objects from China to Afghanistan spanning 5000 years.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.guimet.fr

Traveller's Tip

Make sure you pick up the free audio guide which is available in 6 languages to give an insight into what all the objects are and their history to make your visit a more rewarding experience.
Palais de Chaillot

Palais de Chaillot
This imposing building is found on the top of the Chaillot Hill and was built for the World Fair held in Paris in 1937 on top of the site of the old Palais du Trocadéro. The building has two independent wings that form a wide arc and a wide terrace linking them. The terrace is flanked by bronze statues and from here you get a magnificent view of the Eiffel Tower. In the wings of the Palais de Chaillot are 4 museums. In the west wing are the Musée del’Homme (Museum of Mankind) and the Musée de la Marine (Maritime Museum). In the east wing is the Thêatre National de Chaillot. The Musée del’Homme occupies a large part of the Passy wing of the Palais de Chaillot and was created in 1937 for the Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne. It is a research centre and is part of the Museum of Natural History interested in human beings in relation to prehistory, anthropology and ethnology. Part of the exhibits will transfer to the Quai Branly museum and this museum is closed for renovations until 2012. The Musée de la Marine is one of the oldest maritime museums dating from 1748 when a collection of model ships and naval machinery were displayed in the Marine room of the Louvre. Since 1943 the collection has been found in the Palais de Chaillot. The museum’s displays range from 18th century models to the modern day and are concerned with all aspects of maritime history. The Thêatre National de Chaillot is a theatre company where you can see theatre shows, music concerts,dance shows,contemporary art shows and workshops.
For information about the Palais de Chaillot visit the following website at: http://www.citechaillot.fr/index.php
For information about the Musée de la Marine visit the website at: http://www.musee-marine.fr/index.php?lg=fr&nav=1003
For information about the Thêatre National de Chaillot visit the website at: http://theatre-chaillot.fr (in French only)

Musée Clemenceau
This museum is the apartment of Georges Clemenceau from 1895 to his death in 1929. He was a statesman, journalist, writer, traveller and friend of the arts. The museum has displays of objects, books, manuscripts and newspapers that reflect the life of Georges Clemenceau. There is also a garden to visit that is famous for its roses.
For information about the museum visit the website at:http://www.musee-clemenceau.fr

Passy Cemetery
This famous cemetery is found at 2 Rue du Commandant Schloesing. It opened in 1820 and it soon became the place where the wealthy of Paris were buried. It has many famous people buried here such as writers, actors, artists, musicians, statesmen and historians amongst others. It is best to arm yourself with a map which you can get at the entrance.
For information about this cemetery and others found in Paris visit the following website at:http://www.pariscemeteries.com/pages/passy.html

Maison de Balzac
This is the house that Honoré de Balzac the French novelist lived in from 1840 to 1847. Here he wrote aome of his last works including La Cousine Bette and the rewrite of Comedie Humaine. In this museum you will find personal belongings, paintings, etchings, original manuscripts and illustrations.
For information about the museum visit the following website at:http://www.paris.fr/portail/english/Portal.lut?page_id=8229

Château de la Muette

Château de la Muette
The present day Château de la Muette was built in the 1920s on the former site of three châteaux the first of which dated back to the 16th century. This new château was built by Henri James de Rothchild and it is now the home of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The new château was taken over by the German Army during WW2 and then it was taken over by the United States Army after the liberation of France. In 1949, it became the headquarters of the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation (OEEC) set up under the Marshall Plan to help administer funds provided by the United States to promote post-war recovery and to encourage European economic cooperation. The OEEC developed into the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 1961. You cannot visit this building as an individual but business leaders, trade union representatives, parliamentarians, academics, journalists, university students and other groups of 10 or more can organise visits and if you fall into this category information can be obtained from the OECD website.
For information about the Chateau de la Muette visit the website at: http://www.oecd.org/document/8/0,3746,en_2649_201185_1956607_1_1_1_1,00.html

Musée Marmottan Monet
If you are a lover of Monet’s paintings then this is the best museum in Paris to see them. This museum was originally the 19th century hunting lodge of the Duc de Valmy. More recently it was the home of Paul Marmottan who was an art collector among other things and who left this mansion and art collection to the Académie das Beaux-Arts in 1932 after his death. It has hosted on its lower floors the largest collection of Monet paintings in the world since 1966 when the museum received an endowment from Monet’s son Michel who left more than one hundred canvases of his father’s works to it and so its name was changed to include Monet in its title. Some of the highlights of the collection include Impression: Soleil Levant (Impression: Sunrise) which helped to give the Impressionist movement its name; the Cathédrale de Rouen (Rouen Cathedral) series; the Gare st-Lazare and some of his water lily paintings. Also on this level are other exhibits such as letters exchanged by Impressionist painters Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt. The main floor includes paintings from other artists such as Renoir, Dégas, Gaugin, Manet, and Berthe Morisot as well as furnishings. There is also a room of illuminated medieval manuscripts. The museum also has temporary exhibitions from time to time.
For information about the museum visit the website at: http://www.marmottan.com/index2010_uk.asp

Traveller's Tip

If you want a better understanding of the paintings you are viewing it would be a good idea to buy an English-language catalogue in the museum shop on your way in. Also be aware that this museum isn’t included on the Paris Museum Pass.
  • This museum is close to the Bois de Boulogne and it is a five to ten minute walk to get to the edge of the lakes of the Bois de Boulogne. If it’s lunchtime you could take the small launch over to the Chalet des Iles for a lovely lunch.
    Jardin des Serres d’Auteuil

    Jardin des Serres d’Auteuil
    This botanical garden set inside a huge greenhouse complex is found at the southern edge of the Bois de Boulogne. This site was originally a botanical garden in 1761 for Louis XV but the greenhouses you see today were built between 1895 and 1898 and in 1998 they became part of the Jardin Botanique de la Ville de Paris. Today over 100,000 plants are produced here as decoration for municipal buildings. The palm house which has recently been renovated and the plant collections in the hothouses may be visited all year round from 10am to 5pm in winter and until 6pm in summer. Floral exhibitions take place in spring and in autumn.

    Bois de Boulogne

    Bois de Boulogne
    This wood which is known as the ‘Lungs of Paris’ is a small part of what was the Forest of Rouvray which surrounded the Gallo-Roman city of Lutèc. It was named the Bois de Boulogne in the 14th century by Philippe 1V. There are lots of walking trails and the best of these are towards the southwest corner. You can also hire a bike or bring your own to ride the 14 kilometres of cycle tracks. Other activities you can undertake here are horse riding in the riding school; bowling or you can hire a boat to row in the lake. There is even an outdoor theatre in the middle of the Bois de Boulogne where you can see a Shakespearean play.

    Traveller's Tip

    This is not the area to be in after dark because it is a favourite haunt of prostitutes and criminals despite the many police in this area.
  • In July there is a 3 day weekend party with bands and singers. People camp out overnight here for it.
    For information about events taking place in Paris throughout the year visit the following website at: http://www.timeout.com/paris/