MUNICH — Lehel

Lehel is a city district on the banks of the Isar River near the centre of Munich. It is one of the most desirable residential districts in Munich and a lot of foreign embassies and consulates are located here.

The sights found here are:
Klosterkirche St Anna
Annakirche
Bayerisches Nationalmuseum
Archäologische Staatssammlung
Schack-Galerie
Deutsches Museum
Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde
Max 11 Denkmal
Maximilianbrück.
Aktionsforum Praterinsel
Alpines Museum
Maximilianeum

Klosterkirche St Anna

Klosterkirche St Anna
This pretty little church is found on St-Anna-Platz and is built in the Rococo style of architecture. It was very badly damaged during WW2 and was restored to its former glory in 1968 using the original plans. The magnificent ceiling frescoe was painted by Cosmas Damian Asam.

Annakirche
This church sits on the eastern side of St-Anna-Platz and was built in the late 19th century when the Klosterkirche St Anna became too small for the congregation. It was built in the neo-Romanesque style by Gabriel on Seidl. Inside the church is a huge altar as well as some impressive paintings found in the nave.

Bayerisches Nationalmuseum
This museum is one of Europe’s major art and cultural museums and it mostly contains artefacts from Southern Germany especially those from Bavaria. The ground floor is divided into Romanesque/Gothic and Renaissance collections and the objects found here date from the early Middle Ages to the Rococo period. The highlights on this floor are sculptures by Erasmus Grasser and Tilman Riemenschneider. Upstairs you will find some beautiful pieces of porcelain such as the Nymphenburg porcelain, the beautifully preserved but somewhat over-ornate silver service of Friedrich Wilhelm of Westphalia as well as some musical instruments, board games and games tables. Some of the highlights found here are the Rococo sculptures of Johann Baptist Straub and Ignaz Günther. For more information visit the website at:
http://www.bayerisches-nationalmuseum.de/Engl/b.htm

Archäologische Staatssammlung
This museum which is found behind the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum is the Bavarian State Archaeological collection and contains displays from the Stone Age to the early Middle Ages. There are also special exhibitions which are from early cultures in Bavaria, the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Some of the highlights of the museum are a reconstruction of a burial mound with its engraved stones found in Hall 3 and an impressive mosaic floor which is mostly original from the first half of the 3rd century AD found in Atrium 11.
For more information visit the website at:
http://www.lrz-muenchen.de/~arch/_en/index.html

Schack-Galerie
This gallery is housed in the former Prussian embassy and is now part of the Bavarian State Picture Collection. The original owner of the collection was Adolf Friedrich von Schack who arrived and settled in Munich in 1855. His superb collection of about 270 paintings includes works by Anselm Feuerbach, Moritz von Schwind, Arnold Böcklin, Franz von Lenbach, Carl Spitzweg and Carl Rottmann. Von Schack donated his private collection to Kaiser Wilhelm II who wanted the collection to be left in Munich. Until 1939 the picture collection was owned by the Prussian State but under Hitler it was given to the Bavarian State Collection of Pictures.

Deutsches Museum
This museum is considered the world’s largest science and technology museum. The collection includes a mixture of historically significant objects some dating back to the Stone Age and the museum’s stock is always growing. The main museum is found on an island in the Isar River under Ludwigsbrück. Some of the highlights of the museum include the first motorised aircraft built by the Wright brothers; the U1 submarine; the first program-controlled computer (the Z3 by Conrad Zuse) and Diesel’s original engine. For more information visit the website at:
http://www.deutsches-museum.de/en/information/

Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde
This museum of Ethnology was founded in 1868. It is the second largest museum in Germany and contains a collection of around 150,000 non-European art and objects and an exhibition area of 4,500 square metres. On the first floor you can see an exhibition about the Islamic World and an exhibition about the Art of Oceania. On the second floor there are permanent exhibitions for Art and Culture of the Americas and Africa. There are also non-permanent exhibitions that change every year.
For more information visit the website at:
http://www.voelkerkundemuseum-muenchen.de

Max 11

Max 11 Denkmal
This monument of King Maximilian II is located at the eastern end of Maximilianstrasse. This larger-than-life bronze sculpture was created by Kaspar von Zumbusch in 1875 and shows the King surrounded by symbols of the four royal virtues and four coats of arms of the tribes of Barvaria — Swabia, Rheinland-Palatinate and Franconia.

Maximilianbrucke

Maximilianbrück
This bridge over the Isar River was designed by Friedrich von Thiersch. It is decorated with sculptures and under the bridge is an island called Praterinsel a popular swimming place in summer.

Aktionsforum Praterinsel
This art and cultural centre founded in 1992 is one of Munich’s top exhibition venues. It is found on the river island of Praterinsel near the Maximilianbrücke. It is privately financed and features exhibitions, concerts, parties and other events both in the studios and in the courtyard during the summer.

Alpines Museum
This museum is found on the southern end of Praterinsel and is maintained by the German Alpine Association. It has lots of paintings, scientific instruments and a history of the Association. For more information visit the website at:
http://www.alpenverein.de/template_loader.php?tplpage_id=12&_article_id=2398&PHPSESSID=3792289cb346a922deb8aae09c704799

Maximilianeum

Maximilianeum
This building was built by Friedrich Bürklein between 1857 and 1874 and overlooks the east bank of the Isar River. It was built originally as the result of Maximilian II wanting to build an institution for higher learning and teaching and holding a competition to choose the best design. The result of the competition was unfair because Maximilian dismissed the winning design by Wilhelm Stier and instead gave the project to Friedrich Bürklein who had helped him with other plans for city growth. The building contains three sections — a slightly concave huge centre building and two straight wings. The front has two rows of round arches and there are some beautiful mosaics on the centre section of the building. The interior is decorated with beautiful 19th century works of art, including about 30 pieces that were commissioned by Maximilian II. The building as well as being the home of a gifted students’ foundation has also housed the Bavarian Landtag or State Parliament since 1949. The building has been extended over time to house the new parliament offices.

Traveller's Tip

A very pretty place to walk is on the island found under the Maximilianbrücke called Praterinsel. If you walk to the southern end of the island near the Alpines Museum you can cross the footbridge leading to another river island where the Deutsches Museum is located. Here you will find a very peaceful spot to linger. You will see people feeding ducks and walking dogs.