MUNICH — Karlsplatz to Sendlinger Strasse

At the southern end of this area is the Sendlinger Tor which was built in 1318 by Ludwig the Bavarian as one of the four town gates belonging to the second ring of fortifications around the town. This gate is flanked by two medieval towers and in 1906 the original three arches were replaced by the one large single arch. The Sendlinger Tor marks the southern end of Sendlinger Strasse. If you walk down here via Rosenstrasse you will end up back in Marienplatz at the town hall.

The sights found here are:
Asamkirche
Münchener Stadtmuseum
Jüdisches Museum München
Viktualienmarkt

Asamkirche

Asamkirche
The Catholic Church of St Johann Nepomuk is known as Asamkirche and it was built from 1733 to 1746 by the brothers Egid Quirin Asam and Cosmas Damian Asam as their private church. The population of Munich objected to the private ownership of the church so the brothers were forced to make the church accessible to the public despite them being responsible for all the building costs. It only has 12 rows of pews which makes it one of Munich’s smallest churches. The inside of the church is magnificent with its frescoes and red walls and just about every surface you can see is covered with decoration.
The brothers lived next door to the church and one of the bay windows was built so that Egid could always see the church.

Münchener Stadtmuseum
This is the Municipal Museum which is found in the former armoury building. It gives you insight into the Munich’s history and the daily lives of its people. Special exhibitions are held regularly. Some of the highlights of the museum are a wooden model that shows Munich in 1572 and the Morris dancers (Moriskentanzer) on the ground floor. The Morris dancers are 10 wooden figures, each 60cm high and painted in bright colours. Also on this floor is an excellent exhibit about the role of Munich in the Nazi’s rise to power. It contains photographs, propaganda posters, uniforms and letters from concentration camp inmates. On the upper floor is the wonderful Musical Instruments Museum which has lots of instruments from around the world.
For more information about this museum visit the following website: http://www.muenchen.de/Rathaus/culture/museums/Munich_City_Museum/188621/index.html

Traveller's Tip

If you are travelling with children make sure you visit the Puppet Theatre Museum on the upper floor where there are ‘Punch and Judy’ shows as well as mechanical funfair figures and slot machines.

Jüdisches Museum München
This is the new Jewish museum found in St-Jakobs-Platz, right behind the Stadtmuseum. This complex consists of a synagogue, school and cultural centre. There are three exhibition floors where visitors can gain insights into Jewish life and culture in Munich.
For more information about this museum visit the following website: http://www.juedisches-museum-muenchen.de

Viktualienmarkt

Viktualienmarkt
This is Munich’s most popular open air market. There are stalls where you will find the best quality fruits, vegetables, seafood, cheeses, herbs, honey products, sushi and many other products from Germany and other parts of Europe for sale. The market also hosts a number of traditional events such as the colourful Fasching festivities and the masked dance of the market women on Shrove Tuesday. Next to the market is the site of the ‘Schrannenhalle’ which was built under King Maximilian I in a French design. This was a market hall where grains were sold but it burned down in 1932. A new ‘Schrannenhalle’ was rebuilt with the original wrought-iron frames in 2005. This building contains a market, shops, restaurants and cultural venues and is a popular meeting place.