MUNICH — Neuhausen and Nymphenburg

This area is found northwest of the Hauptbahnhof and is one of Munich’s oldest districts. There are not a lot of sights found in this area but it is one of the more relaxing districts where residents and visitors can forget they are in a city of over a million people. Neuhausen is home to a popular night club and the world’s largest beer garden. There are a large number of good restaurants, cafes and bars found in this area as well.

The sights found here are:
Circus Krone
Schloss Nymphenburg
Neuer Botanischer Garten

Circus Krone
The Circus Krone Building found in southern Neuhausen at the corner of Marsstrasse and Wredestrasse was built in 1919 as the headquarters and main winter venue for Circus Krone. It was the first permanent building for circus performances in Germany. The main arena has been a concert venue, hosting bands like The Beatles and The Who in the 1960s, and Frank Zappa in the 1970s. It is seen on German television every year as the setting for the annual Stars in der Manege charity show where music, television and sport celebrities perform classic circus acts with circus professionals.
For more information on Circus Krone visit the website at:
http://www.circus-krone.de/en/index.html

Schloss Nymphenburg

Schloss Nymphenburg
This Palace is found about 5km northwest of the Old Town and was built as a summer residence after the birth of the long-awaited heir to the throne, Max Emanuel, who was born in 1662 to the Bavarian Elector Ferdinand Maria and his wife, Henriette Adelaide of Savoy. The palace and gardens were continually being added to and it took more than 150 years to complete.

The main building consists of a main villa and two wings. When you enter the main building, you are in the great stone hall, decorated with beautiful stucco and frescoes by Johann Baptist Zimmermann in 1756. This hall was used for both banquets and concerts during the reign of Max Joseph III and concerts are still performed here in summer. The rooms in the Palace are very rich and luxurious but some of the outstanding ones are the apartments of Queen Caroline which is called the ‘Gallery of Beauties’ in the south pavilion. King Ludwig 1 commissioned 36 portraits of the most beautiful women of his day. The paintings by J. Stieler which were painted between 1827 and 1850 include the Schone Munchenerin (lovely Munich girl) and a portrait of Lola Montez a dancer whose friendship with Ludwig caused a scandal that was one of the causes of the Revolution of 1848.

Another area of interest are the former stables that now house the Marstallmuseum. On display here are the coaches and riding gear of the royal family. Some of the highlights here are the glass coronation coach of Elector Karl Albrecht, built in Paris in 1740 and from the same period, the hunting sleigh of Electress Amalia, with the statue of Diana, goddess of the hunt. There is also the very elaborately decorated golden wedding coach of Ludwig 11 which was never used because the wedding was called off. On the first floor is the Porcelain Museum with its collection of Nymphenburg porcelain.

Traveller's Tip

Make sure you see the miniature copies in porcelain of some of the grand masterpieces in the Old Pinakothek. They have the most minute detail. Each was commissioned by Ludwig I.

The royal gardens are simply magnificent, covering 200 hectares and looking just like an English park. A canal runs through it from the foot of the staircase of the palace to the waterfall at the far end. This canal freezes over in winter and you can skate on it. In the park there are some pavilions including the Amalienburg, with its plain exterior but with fantastic Rococo decoration inside. It was built as a hunting lodge for Electress Amalia in 1734 and the hunting theme is evident in the first few rooms and then there are some very colourful rooms with rich carvings and wall paintings.

Traveller's Tip

Make sure you visit the Hall of Mirrors in the Amalienburg. It is absolutely stunning.

The Badenburg or Bathing Pavillion is at the edge of the large Badenburg Lake. In the basement is a bath surrounded by blue and white Dutch tiles and a ceiling painted with frescoes of mythological bathing scenes.

The octagonal Pagodenburg, on the smaller lake on the other side of the canal was built as a Chinese teahouse in the early 18th century.

Magdalenenklause or the Hermitage was intentionally built as a ruin in 1725 as a retreat for prayer and solitude. The four main rooms of the one-story structure are panelled in plain stained oak, with simple furnishings and a few religious paintings. This pavilion in its simplicity is completely different to the other buildings found here.

To get to Schloss Nymphenburg you need to take tram no 17 or bus no 41.
For more information on the palace visit the website at:
http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/palace/index.htm

Neuer Botanischer Garten

Neuer Botanischer Garten
The New Botanical Gardens in Munich were created in 1914 near Nymphenburg Palace because the old Botanical Gardens in the centre near the Hauptbahnhof had become too small. Today the huge park is one of the most significant botanic gardens in the world with more than 14,000 species of plants in an area of 22 hectares. One of the highlights is the rose garden which is full of the most magnificent roses in summer. There are 15 greenhouses near the main entrance at Menzinger Strasse which contain tropical forests, orchids, cacti, desert plants, water plants and meat-eating plants. This is definitely a place to spend several hours and benches are provided for you to sit down, relax and enjoy.There is a small entrance fee of around 3 Euros for adults and the park is open all year except Christmas and New Year.

Traveller's Tip

Look out for the cute tortoises in the greenhouses.