MUNICH — Schwabing

Schwabing was incorporated into the city in 1890 and up until 1914 was an artists’ centre. Some famous writers lived in this area including Thomas Mann, Herman Hesse, Rainer Maria Rilke, Karl Kraus and Franz Wedekind. For a short time after WW2 it was considered to be very hip but most of this characteristic has gone these days and it has become a rich and desirable place to live.

The sights found here are:
Erloserkirche
Wedekindplatz
Schloss Suresne
Seidlvilla
Leopoldstrasse
Siegestor
Ludwigstrasse
Geschwister-Scholl-Platz
Ludwigskirche
Bayerische Staatsbibliothek
Englischer Garten

Erloserkirche

Erloserkirche
This Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Redeemer is the oldest in the Schwabing area and was built in 1899-1901. This church was built just after Art Nouveau had come about and architects were experimenting with this design. The exterior of the church is striking because of the clock on the steeple but of greater interest is the interior which has many Art Nouveau details including the floral decoration on the pillars.

Wedekindplatz
This square is the centre of the old Schwabing area and a commercial market was once found here. It was named after Franz Wedekind who was a playwright. In the 1960’s this square was the centre for beatniks and hippies and the bohemian atmosphere can still be found in a small way with some of the bars and alternative theatres found near here.

Schloss Suresne

Schloss Suresne
This castle was modelled on the Chateau de Suresnes near Paris, by the architect and builder Johann Baptist Gunezrainer between 1715 and 1718. In the past it was a popular meeting place for artists and the painter Paul Klee had a studio there for three years from 1919 to 1922. In 1937 it was bought by the Catholic Church and has hosted many Catholic conferences. In the past it has been opened to the public for classical concerts but it is now home to the Archbishop of Munich and will not be open in the near future for public events or guided tours.

Seidlvilla

Seidlvilla
This beautiful residence is a mixture of German Renaissance and Art Nouveau. Built in 1905 as a private residence it is now publicly owned and used as a community centre and art gallery.

Walking Man

Leopoldstrasse
This wide and shady boulevard is the main street running through Schwabing. You will find lots of bars and cafes where you can sit outside on summer evenings and watch the masses go by. Here you will also find street artists, painters and musicians. The street is closed several times a year for festivals and parades including the Streetlife Festival and St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

Traveller's Tip

Walk down Leopoldstrasse to the Giselastrasse station where you will find a sculpture of a white, three-story alien called Walking Man by Jonathan Borofsky. It is quite unusual and eye-catching.
Siegestor

Siegestor
The Siegestor or Victory Gate consists of three arches with a lion quadriga (chariot) at the top, similar in style to the Arch of Constantine in Rome, the Marble Arch in London, the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and the Brandenburger Tor in Berlin. It is located on the intersection of Leopoldstrasse and Ludwigstrasse and divides the two Munich districts of Maxvorstadt and Schwabing. The gate was commissioned by King Ludwig I of Bavaria in the mid 19th century and was originally dedicated to the glory of the Bavarian army. Today the Siegestor is a monument to peace. After being damaged in WW2 the gate was only partially rebuilt. There is an inscription on the back side which translates as Dedicated to victory, destroyed by war, calling for peace.

Ludwigstrasse
This beautiful and huge boulevard was planned by King Ludwig I as a grand street ‘worthy of his kingdom’. At the northern end of it is the Siegestor and at the southern end is Feldherrnhalle on Odeonsplatz. The street is full of impressive buildings and it is a great place to walk down with its many small shops, art galleries and cafes.

Geschwister-Scholl-Platz
This square is dominated by the main building of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat which has a remarkable assembly hall which is worth a look. The square was named after students who were the founding members of Die Weiss Rose(The White Rose) resistance group that demonstrated against Hitler and printed leaflets about the atrocities of the Nazis. They were finally executed for treason against the Nazi party. The memorial room Gedenkstatte Weisse Rose in the main building atrium of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat commemorates the resistance group.

Ludwigskirche

Ludwigskirche
This Catholic Church found south of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat was built in 1829 in the neo-romanesque style. The design of this church was used a s a model for many other churches of the same period. The church is famous for its frescoe of the Last Judgment by Peter Cornelius which is one of the largest in the world measuring 62 ft by 38 ft and meant to rival Michaelangelo’s own Last Judgment.

Bayerische Staatsbibliothek
The Bavarian State Library is one of Europe’s most important libraries. This library holds almost 10 million volumes, about 50,000 current periodicals and newspapers and 8,500 licensed electronic journals as well as outstanding historical collections and one of the most important manuscript collections worldwide. It is one of the best research libraries in the world as well as Europe’s second-largest journal library, after the British Library. It is located on Ludwigstrasse south of Ludwigskirche.

For more information about this library visit the website at:
http://www.bsb-muenchen.de/index.php?L=3

Englischer Garten

Englischer Garten
This is the oldest public park in Munich and was designed by Friedrich von Sckell in the Serpentine Style and is an outstanding example of a classical landscape garden. The central feature is the circular Monopteros Temple which stands on a mound and overlooks the park. It is one of Europe’s largest city parks covering an area of 5km by 1.5km and is larger than Hyde Park in London or Central Park in New York. In the centre of the park is the lake which is a great place to take a paddle boat around. You will also find a number of restaurants and a very popular beer garden. For more information about these gardens visit the website at:
http://www.schloesser.bayern.de/englisch/garden/objects/mu_engl.htm

Traveller's Tip

This is a wonderful place to come and dine outdoors in one of the restaurants or BYO lunch and enjoy the lovely shaded areas. Try and come during the week when it is not so busy but if it is lunchtime you may find yourself encountering a nude sunbather.